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Individuality: Use Your Voice to Emphasize What Makes You Special in a Crowded Marketplace

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When you begin to create marketing materials and send them out into the world, one of the most important aspects to focus on is your voice. You can describe “voice” in marketing in many ways – from the word choices that you use to the feeling that you’re trying to unlock in your target audience. Even if you’re operating in a crowded marketplace and competition is incredibly stiff, we believe that your voice is one of the best opportunities that you have to emphasize what really makes you special to your readers. By not shying away from this built-in sense of individuality, and instead, embracing it head on, you can really do wonders for your marketing return on investment at the same time.

The Impression That You’re Trying to Create

One of the most important things to understand about your voice in marketing is that it isn’t necessarily something that you can artificially create. It’s something that you’re going to have to find as your business continues to grow and evolve. Once you do discover exactly what that is, however, you’ll want to grab onto it, use it,  and refuse to ever let it go.

Consider the example of Nike as a recent example of a powerful voice in action. Nike’s “Find Your Greatness” campaign played up the idea that amazing things typically have small beginnings and sometimes you really only need a simple “push” to unlock your full potential. Obviously, as one of the premiere footwear manufacturers on the planet, the thesis of the campaign itself is, “If you want to be a great athlete, your journey begins with a pair of Nike shoes.” But, the use of Nike’s voice as a reflection of their own brand and individuality is unmistakable: what Nike is telling its audience is that the shoes themselves are not necessarily great, but the combination of the shoes and the undying will and perseverance of the individual are what will accomplish great things. Nike’s voice in this case has created an emotional connection with its audience. They aren’t saying, “Buy these shoes because they’re the comfiest or longest lasting shoes that you will ever have.” They’re saying, “If you want to accomplish the impossible, step one is buying a pair of Nike shoes.”

Is it bold? Yes. Is it almost brash in its confidence? Absolutely. But regardless of whether or not you buy into the marketing line as a consumer, you can’t argue with the fact that it is a startlingly simple campaign that distills what makes Nike unique into one positive message of empowerment.

Your Voice is as Unique as Your Business

Never forget that the form your voice takes depends on the impression that you’re trying to create. If you sell shoes and you want to come off like a friendly neighbor who just happens to be a clothing manufacturer, you would want your marketing language to take a much more casual and flowery approach. If you want to come across as a professional expert, you would essentially go in the other direction and prove yourself trustworthy through word choice. The key is experimenting and finding the voice behind your company and then using it to separate yourself from the rest.

These are just a few of the key reasons why embracing your voice and emphasizing what makes your business unique in marketing are so important. It isn’t necessarily what you sell that makes you successful – it’s how you choose to sell it. There are a million different companies that sell widgets out there, but what is it that really makes people want to buy YOUR widgets above anyone else’s? The answer is your voice. If you can master that, everything else will fall into place.

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This entry was posted on October 6, 2015 by .
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